Saturday, December 22, 2018

Preshow Press

I'll up-date as able.....

FIRST official announcement of 5th Awards nominees at Lex Community Radio

Lex Community Radio Facebook announcement

Podcast at WBVX radio

Bluegrass Today

Big Blue Tunes blog




Saturday, December 15, 2018

5th Award Nominees Announced

The announcement went out to the public via Lexington Community Radio chatting with Renee and Mark, followed by the podcast & on-air interview on WBVX with Max Corona.

Check the WLXU audio out here:

https://vimeo.com/306579994?fbclid=IwAR1fL7V9UyBv0JCHrZAegdQrFt8-9hjh-tVeUUi7Xz13eK9awSKfMpFi_8k

Check the WBVX audio here:

http://www.classicrock921fm.com/2018/12/14/lexington-music-awards-nominations/

And here is the list:

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Guitar award & Blues award

Blues man TeeDee Young has won the blues category 4 years in a row, and guitarist Ben Lacy has won the guitarist category 4 years in a row.
Ben Lacy (l) & TeeDee Young (r) 

To honor their years of dedication to their crafts, we are going to "retire" their names from said categories (they will be eligible in all other categories) and re-name the awards to honor them.

Henceforth, the guitarist award will be called "The Ben Lacy Award for Guitar Excellence".

The blues award will be called "The TeeDee Young Award for Blues Excellence".

The only other Lexi Music Award bearing a name is "The Jay Flippin Music Educator Award".

No similar award namings are planned for the foreseeable future.

5th Lexi Awards "Women in Music" Theme

Our over-arching theme for the 2019 Lexi Music Awards will be ""Women in Arts & Music".

As such, we are implementing several things, including

1) The Twiggenburys (our house band) will be replaced this year by a female-fronted or all-female act (auditioning acts now).

2) All of our musical performances at the awards show (Sunday, January 27 at the Lyric Theatre) will be female or female-fronted acts.

3) Our pro panel is going to be exclusively female.

4) We're even looking at businesses that are female owned and/or operated to be our sponsors.

5) And, of course, Edd MacKey from the Lexington Fashion Collaborative will be bringing young ladies to work as presenter guides (though this year will also be the first year we will have a few male presenter guides), who will be wearing clothing designed and made by local (female) designers.

More announcements soon!


Thursday, October 18, 2018

PUBLIC VOTING ACTIVE!

Go vote NOW. Voting ends early November, so dont wait to tell your friends, family, peers, fellow music lovers, fan base, customers......

VOTE HERE!

Sunday, October 14, 2018

Why #10

10) Use it as a vehicle to "raise all boats".

That is, no one working in music today should be making 1985 pay rates. Not the venues, not the players, not the agents, not the sound techs, not the recording engineers.... Let's fix this.

Why #9

9) Use it as a vehicle to connect with other arts programs.

Yeah...from music orgs like KY Music Hall of Fame to organizations focused on theater, fashion, and the like. Think what this could turn into! We already work closely with the Lexington Fashion Collaborative on the awards show and want to expand these associations rapidly.

Why #8

8) Use it as a vehicle to expand artist opportunities.

One goal is to have every winner (and later down the road, every nominee) be guaranteed a slot at a regional festival. For example, bluegrass winner secures spot at major area bluegrass festival; rock winner secures slot at rock festival; jazz winner secures slot at jazz festival.

Why #7

7) Use it as a vehicle to raise money for arts programs.


Specifically, one goal is to raise a substantial sum each year, have central KY high schools submit an application, and choose a different winner each year to donate to their school music program.

Saturday, October 13, 2018

Why #6

6) Use it as a vehicle to educate.

If you've been to an awards show, you've seen how different the performance line-up is than any other awards performance lineup anywhere, at any time. Rock, jazz, folk, classical, country, pop, bluegrass, and more! All of us (event organizers to professional players to music fans) get an education on the depth and breadth of not only area music, but music as a whole.

Why #5

5) Use it as a vehicle to launch other artist-aiding projects.

A nexus from which to expand into events like the Lexi-Fest Concert Series (we've organized dozens of these shows in Lexington, Georgetown, Richmond, Frankfort, and more since we kicked this series off, and raised money for non-profits like Greenhouse 17 and others) and other ways to provide performance opportunities and revenue streams for artists; drive music fans to live shows at all the area venues; more work for sound techs; and the like.

Why #4

4) Use it as both a vehicle for culture and commerce.

Culture drive commerce. And a more unified music community can also help to unify the entire arts community (dance, fashion, visual arts, and more).

Why #3

3) Use it as a vehicle for professional development.

Expanding the awards night into a full-blown weekend of professional workshops and clinics covering everything from aspects of the music business (legalities like copyright, publishing, & more) to presentation (from fashion to stagecraft) to expert talks on songwriting, improvisation, future trends, booking tours, and much more.

Why #2

2) Use it as a vehicle to honor the entire music community.

A way to acknowledge and honor more than just styles of music (like the Grammys) or individual musicianship (like interest/instrument specific magazines) or similar...but instead to recognize and honor everyone from the industry side (studios, retail shops, venues, management companies, repair shops, etc) to styles and individual excellence and, of course, music lovers. In a word, the entire music community, not one small part of it.

WHY #1

1) Use it as a vehicle for musician networking.

The idea of putting musicians who otherwise might never hear (or hear of) each other in a room together at least once a year is, I would think (at least from an artistic perspective), both obvious and compelling.

Monday, October 8, 2018

Why We Do It

Its not like I haven't mentioned any "whys" when asked. I just never go deep because I thought the answers would bore everyone to death. Afterall, no one asks WHY the Grammys; WHY the Oscars; WHY the Tonys; WHY the Pulitzers; WHY about any of the other awards programs for the arts and whatnot.

Or maybe they do and I was never listening.

But a conversation with Leo Brown (and, in retrospect, every journalist or TV anchor or radio DJ who ever said "Why did you decide to do this?") has made me re-think my hesitance in openly exploring this with the public.

Sooo....I'll elaborate later, but for now, a BAKER'S DOZEN reasons and goals....Starting with reason ZERO (otherwise we have to end with 13, and we need all the luck we can get - haha!):

0) Use it as a vehicle to create a red carpet event for the entire Lexington Area!

How often do any of use get to red carpet and velvet rope? Ladies in evening gowns and gentlemen in tuxedos? A full-throttle night on the town in your Sunday Best? We want to step it all up in an annual uber-classy event with music as the center of gravity pulling it all together!

More HERE (coming soon).

1) Use it as a vehicle for musician networking.

The idea of putting musicians who otherwise might never hear (or hear of) each other in a room together at least once a year is, I would think (at least from an artistic perspective), both obvious and compelling.

More HERE.

2) Use it as a vehicle to honor the entire music community.

A way to acknowledge and honor more than just styles of music (like the Grammys) or individual musicianship (like interest/instrument specific magazines) or similar...but instead to recognize and honor everyone from the industry side (studios, retail shops, venues, management companies, repair shops, etc) to styles and individual excellence and, of course, music lovers. In a word, the entire music community, not one small part of it.

More HERE.

3) Use it as a vehicle for professional development.

Expanding the awards night into a full-blown weekend of professional workshops and clinics covering everything from aspects of the music business (legalities like copyright, publishing, & more) to presentation (from fashion to stagecraft) to expert talks on songwriting, improvisation, future trends, booking tours, and much more.

More HERE.

4) Use it as both a vehicle for culture and commerce.

Culture drives commerce. And a more unified music community can also help to unify the entire arts community (dance, fashion, visual arts, and more).

More HERE.

5) Use it as a vehicle to launch other artist-aiding projects.

A nexus from which to expand into events like the Lexi-Fest Concert Series (we've organized dozens of these shows in Lexington, Georgetown, Richmond, Frankfort, and more since we kicked this series off, and raised money for non-profits like Greenhouse 17 and others) and other ways to provide performance opportunities and revenue streams for artists; drive music fans to live shows at all the area venues; more work for sound techs; and the like.

More HERE.

6) Use it as a vehicle to educate AND entertain.

If you've been to an awards show, you've seen how different the performance line-up is than any other awards performance lineup anywhere, at any time. Rock, jazz, folk, classical, country, pop, bluegrass, and more! All of us (event organizers to professional players to music fans) get an education on the depth and breadth of not only area music, but music as a whole.

Here HERE.

7) Use it as a vehicle to raise money for arts programs.

Specifically, one goal is to raise a substantial sum each year, have central KY high schools submit an application, and choose a different winner each year to donate to their school music program.

More HERE.

8) Use it as a vehicle to expand artist opportunities.

One goal is to have every winner (and later down the road, every nominee) be guaranteed a slot at a regional festival. For example, bluegrass winner secures spot at major area bluegrass festival; rock winner secures slot at rock festival; jazz winner secures slot at jazz festival.

Forecastle, KY State Fair, Masters Musician Festival, Bourbon & Beyond, Blues Between the Bridges, Festival of the Bluegrass, Abby Road on the River, Great American Brass Band Festival....and on and on and on.....these are all area festivals we'd like to work with and we are actively pursuing working relationships with these folks.

More HERE.

9) Use it as a vehicle to connect with other arts programs.

Yeah...from music orgs like KY Music Hall of Fame to organizations focused on theater, fashion, and the like. Think what this could turn into! We already work closely with the Lexington Fashion Collaborative on the awards show and want to expand these associations rapidly.

More HERE.

10) Use it as a vehicle to "raise all boats".

That is, no one working in music today should be making 1985 pay rates. Not the venues, not the players, not the agents, not the sound techs, not the recording engineers.... Let's fix this.

More HERE.

11) Use it as a vehicle to promote excellence.

I actually don't care for most awards shows. The idea that something so subjective as artistic value would be reduced to a mere popularity contest (whether its something popular among the general public or the arts community doesn't change that awards are predominantly such contests) just rubs me the wrong way.

But then I got to thinking....

And I was willing to try it if it would give me social capital to help other artists. And so I tried it. And it worked, in that its secured me leverage to do a lot that I could never have gotten accomplished (see above list re: Lexi-Fest Concert SEries, et al) without such a show.

And then I got to thinking more...

And the reality, whether we like to admit it or not, is that sometimes competition helps keep us on our toes. Helps us up our game. Helps us seek artistic excellence. And, if conversations with shop owners and musicians and arts orgs and DJs and such is any indication, its worked here, too.

The big trick is keeping that competition HEALTHY and not allowing it to become corrosive.

12) Use it as a vehicle for my selfish agenda.

Hahaha! Which is to say, I also have a few selfish reasons.

I suppose, given the goal-setting outlined above, I should be equally transparent with regard to my personal reasons.....which reduce to, really, one prime mover.

Legacy.

At the risk of ending on a low note, I am of the age where mortality is no longer conceptual. I've watched music peers cross the bridge, as it were, too many times in the past decade. And so my ego, I suppose it is, demands that I build something (and do something)....unequivocal.

Bluntly, if I were gone tomorrow, I'd want to leave something for which my kids and grandkids can be proud. Something crucial and positive for the community that they know I built with my bare hands...but not alone. Something that forced me to reach out and build partnerships and relationships and friendships to create something that will last and continue to grow.

Something that they will look at long after I'm gone....and make them smile.




Monday, February 12, 2018

Pre Wrap

I'll do a proper wrap-up soon, but just wanted to say WOW! Stunning musical performances, great hosts, presenters and guides on point.....in short, everyone involved brought their A Game.

I am humbled and proud!

Thank you Marcie Timmerman. For everything!

=====

(edit - here's the wrap up)

Herald-Leader write up.....

RJMeads....

Video - Troy Gentry Lifetime Achievement



Album of the year: “Silhouettes” by A Little Bit More

Song of the year: “Tried and Crucified” by Whitney Acke and Ray Adams

Critics’ choice: Italian Beaches

Community service: Twisted Cork Songwriters in the Round

Best Americana/folk: The Local Honeys

Best blues: Tee Dee Young

Best classical: Lexington Philharmonic

Best bluegrass: The Wooks

Best country: Sundy Best

Best hip-hop/rap: Devine Carama

Best jazz/Latin/big band/world: (Tie) Gayle Winters and Zach Brock

Best singer-songwriter: Whitney Acke

Best pop: Brother Smith

Best rock: Magnolia Boulevard

Best cover band/variety act: Rebel Without a Cause

Best funk/R&B/reggae: Driftwood Gypsy

Best female vocalist: Taylor Hughes

Best male vocalist: Derrick Spencer

Best drummer/percussionist: Tripp Bratton

Best guitarist: Ben Lacy

Best bassist: Bob Bryant

Best keyboardist: Raleigh Dailey

Best wind/brass: Miles Osland

Best strings: Raymond McClain

Best live music venue: The Burl

Best music store (instruments): The DooWop Shop

Best music store (CDs, etc.): Pops Resale

Best recording studio/producer/engineer: Long Island (Steve Nall)

Jay Flippin Music Educator Award: Paul Felice

Best live sound tech: Matt Florez

Best DJ (radio): DeBraun Thomas, WUKY-FM

Best instrument repair/builders/customization: Wilcutt Guitar